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jmolli

Insects Attracted to IR Illuminators ??

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I installed a Vivotek IP8332 to keep an eye on my cars back in February. It's just getting warm enough here in NJ for the insects to come out of their winter hibernation and I had at least 20 false motion events last night due to bugs buzzing around my camera! Are insects attracted to the IR Illuminators on our IP cams the same way they are attracted to incandescent light bulbs?? Night mode used to be when I got the least amount of false events, now it's almost as bad as the swaying tree shadows and passing clouds I get in the day time.

 

What has your experience been?

 

 

John

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Big time. And in general, the IR picks up every little bit of insects that fly by anyways, it just illuminates them like they are rain.

 

May be good to adjust your schedule to not record on motion at night.

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Isn't there an option on your camera to no record insects? Try putting a camera on a tall pole and watch how many great images of birds you get that land on it. In one case, actually the weight of the bird tilted the camera.

 

The best thing to do is to not rely on video motion detection if a lot of false alerts bothers you. Get an external PIR motion detector, they are cheap, realiable and with most cameras, pretty easy to setup.

 

Another thing you can do is move to So Cal, less flying insects.

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What's the alternative?

 

Sorry, what I meant to say is just record full time at night and motion during the day.

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Best option from what I have read is to turn the IR off on the camera and buy a standalone IR Illuminator and mount it nearby the camera.

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What's the alternative?

 

Sorry, what I meant to say is just record full time at night and motion during the day.

And if the problem is that bug movement is constantly triggering recording, how does this give any different results?

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May as well have full time recording as opposed to buttloads of false triggers, as there really isnt much difference this time of year. I think one good thing about MD recording (other than saving hard drive space) is it helps with searching the recordings alot better, but this kind of gets thrown out the window with insects constantly triggering the recordings so the purpose is defeated. We have some giant bugs here in Oklahoma, and its a complete waste of time to record an IR outdoor camera at night for motion this time of year, until the next freeze.

 

If MD recording is critical with an outdoor IR camera, I like the idea of alarm based devices such as PIR's alot better than pixel based motion.

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Here in South Florida the bugs are always a problem. We try spraying bug spray around the outdoor cameras, but it doesn't last too long, plus it can be a pain to wipe off the lens if you happen to spray wrong or a little gust of wind comes.

 

A buddy of mine had an interesting idea of placing a fan near outdoor cameras to keep the bugs away. Down here many supermarkets have air curtains at the entrances - basically fans that blow downward at the entrances & exits that create an air curtain bugs can't fly through. Some have large, freestanding fans that do a similar job.

 

Anyway, the idea is similar - create an air curtain by the camera. I don't know where to get a weatherproof fan that can be mounted outside, but it's an idea.

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May as well have full time recording as opposed to buttloads of false triggers, as there really isnt much difference this time of year. I think one good thing about MD recording (other than saving hard drive space) is it helps with searching the recordings alot better, but this kind of gets thrown out the window with insects constantly triggering the recordings so the purpose is defeated. We have some giant bugs here in Oklahoma, and its a complete waste of time to record an IR outdoor camera at night for motion this time of year, until the next freeze.

Ah-ha! So if you're set for MD recording, and it's recording all the time at night, there's no difference if you switch to constant record, so why bother?

 

Come winter when the bugs subside, then you have to switch back to MD... so why not just leave it alone in the first place?

 

If MD recording is critical with an outdoor IR camera, I like the idea of alarm based devices such as PIR's alot better than pixel based motion.

Bingo!

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Ah-ha! So if you're set for MD recording, and it's recording all the time at night, there's no difference if you switch to constant record, so why bother?

 

Cause it just looks crappy on the playback screen, all those little specs of on and off recording "bugs" me (no pun intended) a nice pretty solid line looks better than a bunch of morse code

 

Come winter when the bugs subside, then you have to switch back to MD... so why not just leave it alone in the first place?

 

Because in the winter, there aint nothing better to do than go hunting, watch football, and play with your surveillance stuff.

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The flying insects will calm down too. It's just the hatching season at the moment. Before long a ton will die or be eaten. I've been surprised to see that motion hasn't been triggered as much as I thought it would be, considering. Try and lower the sensitivity for the moment too.

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Depending on how many bugs you get, you can extend the trigger time for motion recording. I'm in NorCal, and we don't get that many bugs at the cameras, so extending the trigger time from 1/2 second to 1 second really reduces the bug-induced triggers, while still catching normal motion (mostly cars and cats for me).

 

If you attract swarms of them, this won't help as much. It's also no good when a spider builds a web across the lens, because of how much they crawl back and forth, but this can be helped by attaching a bug spray soaked cloth near the glass.

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I think I was reading somewhere yesterday that there's some range of light that most IR light sources put out (but which is not strictly IR?) that bugs are attracted to and if you filter those out then they won't be attracted.. Too bad I can't find where I read that.. I did find this amusing article that has since been retracted.. Oh well.. How about hiring a kid with a water pistol to use IR glasses and shoot whatever is moving.. You can stimulate the local economy that way..

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More bug related weirdness. It hit 91 in NJ the other day and the bees were quite active. The weird thing was a bee or bees repeatedly flying into the lens of my IP8332 bullet cam. I must have had 30 false events that resulted in close up recordings of bees flying into my lens! What could be attracting them in the daylight hours

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I would leave it on motion recording..... Even if it records most of the time it is still less then all the time and will save you storage space.

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Consider getting a dedicated IR illuminator and turn off the one on the IP8332. I did the same thing though not because of bugs but due to IR halo effect (which you apparently aren't having... lucky you!). I don't think it it will totally resolve the bugs setting it off issue but should reduce it.

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We have only a few cams with IR, get spiders. The rest with external visible and IR. It helps since if the IR is not internal it does not attract or light up the bugs. The other thing to try is running some analytics if you're having trouble with lighting or trees. Still gets captured somewhat but pretty easy to set up a rule to not respond. Try the free demo of VitaminD, still my favorite. Built in motion detection is just not worth the time and energy outdoors.

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In the past I have one solution that works.

 

Put a GEKO on a leash that will eat the bugs but give him enough room to hide under the sunsheild on hot days.. We called ours " The Gekonator " and to this day is working but getting a little fat now days due to the plentiful food supply...

 

hahah just kidding we called him " Geks " the other was too long.

 

MM

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