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Tips for mounting cameras behind glass?

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I'd like to have a PTZ dome, however, I really don't want one hanging off the front of my house. I have a dormer window that has attic space behind it, I was thinking of mounting the camera behind the window to not be so obvious.

 

I've tried mounting cameras behind glass before and had some issues with reflections of the camera. Any tips for a successful install?

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I'd like to have a PTZ dome, however, I really don't want one hanging off the front of my house. I have a dormer window that has attic space behind it, I was thinking of mounting the camera behind the window to not be so obvious.

 

I've tried mounting cameras behind glass before and had some issues with reflections of the camera. Any tips for a successful install?

 

There isn't much you can do but the following should help.

 

1. Make sure there's no lights inside the building.

2. Mount the camera as close to the window as possible

3. You could... coat your windows with anti-reflective treatment, but I don't think this will help much.

 

But if the camera has outdoor housing, I would install it outdoors and make obvious that you ARE watching.

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1. Don't do it.

2. Don't do it.

3. Especially don't do it if the camera has IR.

4. DON'T DO IT.

 

I agree with point 3 above, but if you do it correctly there should be no problem.

 

Look at the front of pretty much any outdoor housing for a box camera and what do you see? A sheet of glass. If the OP were to put his camera inside a small box (open on one end), paint the inside of the box flat black, press the open end of the box against the window glass, and disable the internal IR illuminators (if any), what would be the problem?

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1. Don't do it.

2. Don't do it.

3. Especially don't do it if the camera has IR.

4. DON'T DO IT.

 

I agree with point 3 above, but if you do it correctly there should be no problem.

 

Look at the front of pretty much any outdoor housing for a box camera and what do you see? A sheet of glass. If the OP were to put his camera inside a small box (open on one end), paint the inside of the box flat black, press the open end of the box against the window glass, and disable the internal IR illuminators (if any), what would be the problem?

At THAT point the camera would look cosmetically better on the outside of the house

 

I don't think you should bother with a ptz if you have to compromise it's performance, never using IR. And I think you'd probably get some image distortion looking through a window, especially at night. Either a properly installed ptz is a solution or it isn't. Otherwise, think about a smaller varifocal mounted outside to get the fov you need.

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At THAT point the camera would look cosmetically better on the outside of the house

 

I don't think you should bother with a ptz if you have to compromise it's performance, never using IR.

 

I agree, it would be a waste of a PTZ to put it behind a window because of the limited FOV. However, I have put several box and dome cameras in the window of my spare bedroom at various times and the performance isn't compromised too much. A black box or even a black blanket around the camera eliminates the reflection problems quite nicely.

 

As for the IR, disable the built-in IR (if any) and then mount an illuminator outside the house.

 

Not saying it's optimal, but it is one option for the OP.

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I have one of those little quarter sized bullets looking thru a window in my garage that has worked great for years.

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1. Don't do it.

2. Don't do it.

3. Especially don't do it if the camera has IR.

4. DON'T DO IT.

 

I agree with point 3 above, but if you do it correctly there should be no problem.

 

Look at the front of pretty much any outdoor housing for a box camera and what do you see? A sheet of glass. If the OP were to put his camera inside a small box (open on one end), paint the inside of the box flat black, press the open end of the box against the window glass, and disable the internal IR illuminators (if any), what would be the problem?

 

It MAY be a sheet of glass but not the same as in your window. Glass has a high attenuation to IR. I am guessing that if the camera was anything less than perpendicular to the window then you would get complete white-out from reflected/refracted IR

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It can be done, and it is the best way for certain situations to my mind:

 

1. Use one way glass film to prevent people seeing it.

2. People can still see it at night if a light is on inside the house, so use a black box sealed to the window to prevent this and to allow continuous vision to outside ( one way film would work in reverse at night). Anything truly opaque will work, even a plastic bag if it's thick enough. Irregular shapes are preferred in some respects.

3. Use a camera that meters through the lens, not through a hole in the body.

4. Infrared will not work if it is mounted on the camera as this will reflect as stated previously.

5. Black tape over a separately located IR light will disguise the lights but still allow light out. This will go through the glass to outside, but I'm not sure how much filters out if behind one way glass.

 

Good luck.

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If you can't have a ptz outside where you want it because you're too chicken it will get damaged or you have no taste, than don't get a ptz, period. If you love cameras they ALL look good hanging off the front of the house

 

Crippling a ptz by installing it behind a window inside looking out is offensive to me...and the camera. It will likely produce terrible images just to spite you.

 

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I'd like to have a PTZ dome, however, I really don't want one hanging off the front of my house. I have a dormer window that has attic space behind it, I was thinking of mounting the camera behind the window to not be so obvious.

 

I've tried mounting cameras behind glass before and had some issues with reflections of the camera. Any tips for a successful install?

 

The IR will reflect back from the glass. Only way to make it work is to unplug the IR and use a external IR on the other side of the glass.

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If you can't have a ptz outside where you want it because you're too chicken it will get damaged or you have no taste, than don't get a ptz, period. If you love cameras they ALL look good hanging off the front of the house

 

Crippling a ptz by installing it behind a window inside looking out is offensive to me...and the camera. It will likely produce terrible images just to spite you.

 

 

While I agree it is not the optimal solution to have a ptz behind a window, and it limits the camera drastically, there are many scenarios where having it behind a window can be an adequate solution for people if you disable the built in IR via firmware or other means, and use an outdoor IR unit preferably pointing to the scene from a different direction from where the camera is located.

 

There is also something to be said for using stealth methods and not broadcasting to the world that a camera is present. I have time and time again witnessed people acting differently when they notice a camera is present. Not to mention, some people may not want others to know from a privacy standpoint that the area is being monitored.

 

And sometimes, the site of outdoor cameras is just begging for bb\pellet\splatball guns \ green lasers to be used against them by people who just don't care if they are picked up on the cameras (transients, jokers, lamers, etc.). The bright bulbs of the neighborhood.

 

It is a shame to have to limit a ptz that way, but there are so many times when it can really be an effective tool.

 

Plus, ptz's are so much fun to use. They can brighten up your day just by using them.

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I simply do not want to get into a battle with my HOA.

 

Multiple cameras concealed in bird-boxes (unable to be used by birds)

 

Have one bird-box with the camera inside the box showing genuine nesting birds. That's the one you show anyone from the HOA who visits.

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I agree with TipoFloe. There isnt much you can really do, as the glass is naturally reflective. And at night time, the LED sometimes reflect back, giving no image at all. Best to always drill a hole so you can mount the camera outside.

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Why spend on a PTZ? there are perfectly good indoor zoom cameras available with motorized zoom and auto focus

Why do you need infrared, are you spying on someone? Whats wrong with common PIR floods? They drive criminals away and startle would be criminals.

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I agree with TipoFloe. There isnt much you can really do, as the glass is naturally reflective. And at night time, the LED sometimes reflect back, giving no image at all. Best to always drill a hole so you can mount the camera outside.

 

That's why you have infra-red on the camera turned off and use external ir instead. You can also use much more ir that way and position it in the most optimal ways.

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Why spend on a PTZ? there are perfectly good indoor zoom cameras available with motorized zoom and auto focus

Why do you need infrared, are you spying on someone? Whats wrong with common PIR floods? They drive criminals away and startle would be criminals.

 

PIR's are great. but having a a large flood light turn on when a PIR detects something, not so great all the time under all circumstances.

 

In some neighborhoods, the kids love, did it say love? Yep, love lights that turn on bright when you walk by them. They love them so much, they actually go on your property more to set them off, and see if they can get the homeowner annoyed enough to come out and chase them, etc. Seen it happen in many places.

 

Also, sometimes, having a light come on in certain neighborhoods can really annoy other neighbors. It also is not great for light pollution. http://www.darksky.org/

 

It's extremely tacky under certain circumstances. but yeah, it does scare some people away, but attracts others. The miscreants, the dreads, the others.

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I have been monitoring my driveway with an internal IP camera behind a double-glazed window. I have disabled the IR leds, so as to avoid any window glare, and have illuminated my driveway with an external IR spotlight with a range of 10 metres - which is the length of the driveway. Whilst this is fine during the day, the night image is extremely poor, presumably because a lot of the IR light is being blocked by the double-glazing. In addition, the driveway is 45 degrees to the house so I cannot get the camera right up to the window, although it is in a spare room that is unlit.

 

If I were to replace the 10m spotlight with one that has a range of 45 metres, would I see any significant improvement in the image? At present, I can barely make out the shape of the car on the driveway. With the window open, the image is much better so it does seem that the window blocks most of the IR light. Clearly, the best option would be to have an external camera, but I was hoping to have the camera inside so as not to annoy neighbours etc.

 

Thanks for any advice.

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1. Don't do it.

2. Don't do it.

3. Especially don't do it if the camera has IR.

4. DON'T DO IT.

 

I have to double agree with this.

 

By mounting it indoors in a dormer, you will effectively cut down the range of view the camera has, you could probably cover all that with two mini zoom cameras. The best place to install a PTZ on a building is on an outside corner where its range is about 270 degrees in the horizontal plane. Putting inside like you want will reduce that range to less than 180degrees and probably ruin the view from that dormer completely and for what? It'll be rubbish I promise you. IF A CLIENT OF MINE WANTED ME TO DO THAT I'D DEMAND THEY SIGN A DISCLAIMER FIRST.

 

and all this is quite apart from the IR isue which you cannot cheat physics. Glass will reflect the IR back and you will need some space to allow a PTZ to move otherwise whats the point of having one, you can't outsmart science and the further away from the glass the more IR light will be reflected direct into the lens

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I have been monitoring my driveway with an internal IP camera behind a double-glazed window. I have disabled the IR leds, so as to avoid any window glare, and have illuminated my driveway with an external IR spotlight with a range of 10 metres - which is the length of the driveway. Whilst this is fine during the day, the night image is extremely poor, presumably because a lot of the IR light is being blocked by the double-glazing. In addition, the driveway is 45 degrees to the house so I cannot get the camera right up to the window, although it is in a spare room that is unlit.

 

If I were to replace the 10m spotlight with one that has a range of 45 metres, would I see any significant improvement in the image? At present, I can barely make out the shape of the car on the driveway. With the window open, the image is much better so it does seem that the window blocks most of the IR light. Clearly, the best option would be to have an external camera, but I was hoping to have the camera inside so as not to annoy neighbours etc.

 

Thanks for any advice.

 

Anybody?

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I have been monitoring my driveway with an internal IP camera behind a double-glazed window. I have disabled the IR leds, so as to avoid any window glare, and have illuminated my driveway with an external IR spotlight with a range of 10 metres - which is the length of the driveway. Whilst this is fine during the day, the night image is extremely poor, presumably because a lot of the IR light is being blocked by the double-glazing. In addition, the driveway is 45 degrees to the house so I cannot get the camera right up to the window, although it is in a spare room that is unlit.

 

If I were to replace the 10m spotlight with one that has a range of 45 metres, would I see any significant improvement in the image? At present, I can barely make out the shape of the car on the driveway. With the window open, the image is much better so it does seem that the window blocks most of the IR light. Clearly, the best option would be to have an external camera, but I was hoping to have the camera inside so as not to annoy neighbours etc.

 

Thanks for any advice.

 

Anybody?

 

I'd say you've already got your answer from the above responses.

 

No matter what, you're best off having the camera outside if its viewing the outside.

If the window material is blocking ir light from the 10meter light source, I don't see how the 45meter source is gonna be better.

Further distance from the light source will be illuminated but the window will still block the same amount of ir light.

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But if it can reach out to 45 metres, presumably it is emitting more IR than a spotlight that is designed to reach only 10 metres i.e. it's 'brighter'. To me, that means that there will be more IR to pass through the glass and be picked up by the internal camera. Or doesn't it work that way?

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